How to See Sequoias in March

I was going to be spending a week in Vegas for business and I convinced Dan to fly out and meet me for the weekend. When we were planning ideas on what to do, a lot of options came up. At first we thought the Grand Canyon, but Dan had already been there. We then thought about Joshua Tree National Park, but it was too far. When I pulled up the map – it hit me,
I remembered reading about the largest trees in the world in elementary school with a dream to one day see them.

We had to see the Sequoia’s, but should we visit Sequoia National Forest or Sequoia National Park? March can be a real hit or miss based on elevations, closures, and snowfall. We were immediately able to see via Google Maps that there were many road closures in the area due to snow.

We first looked into Sequoia National Park. The National Park Service website provided some insight and had a link to check current conditions. The alerts stated for March that tire chains may be required, however, below the alert it stated that they were required. The site also stated that road closures were possible but did not provide the roads that were actually closed. When we contacted the park the ranger informed us there was no way to see the Sequoias – even a southern grove in Sequoia National Forest, all roads were inaccessible.

The news from the park ranger wasn’t going to work for us, with the varying elevations and weather we knew there had to be other options. We started to research Sequoia National Forest. The USDA Forest Service had updates on current conditions as well, and even a webcam – but it was down for construction so again, not helpful. We contacted the National Forest supervisors office (559.784.1500), who finally gave us some clear insight.

While many of the roads were closed there was a more southern grove that was open, Belknap Grove in Camp Nelson. On the website the season is identified as April-November, however it was still open in March. Belknap is a southern grove at a lower elevation of 5,000 feet, however the trail was still spotted with snow; the higher you hike the higher the snow. The grove is just under 5,000 acres.

We drove six hours from Vegas to the forest. We camped in the back of the Yukon rental that was comprised of our inflatable pillows, sleeping mats and sleeping bags. The temperature the first night was going to get down to 30 degrees, so we were sure to pack our 0 degree bags.

After a few hours of sleep morning light flickered through the truck’s windows. We stepped out into views that can only be described as other worldly. I instantly became emotional and tears started streaming down my cheeks . Dan asked what wrong – the answer was nothing. I felt a powerful connection to creation here, to our natural world. It was overwhelming. Don’t let March get in your way of seeing this magnificence – you won’t want to miss it.

Looking for more tips on Sequoia? Check out our blog post, 3 National Parks In 3 Days for tips on hiking in the area.